My Dad

My dad died suddenly on March 26, 2013. I have about a dozen, half-written blog posts on my computer that I just can’t bring myself to publish. Some of these posts describe the life of my dad, and others are my conversations with him after his death. None of these posts feel right. None of these posts are good enough to describe his life, his accomplishments, his lasting influence on me, or how horribly I miss him. He was my father and my very best friend. And his loss is so incredibly painful.

Saying Goodbye

But I have to move on. By writing a few incomplete thoughts here I am hoping that I can move forward in some little way. I know that dad would want that.

The night before he died, dad talked with my entire family. He spoke to my three kids telling them each how much he loved and missed them. Then, he and I had our last conversation. Dad told me how much he loved me, and how I have made him proud. He was unusually sad, and he said it over and over again. I feel now that he, in some way, knew his time had come.

Since he passed away, I’ve wondered what I could have said differently to him during our last call. I told him that I loved him, that I missed him very much, and that I would see him very soon. I am so happy that these were my last words to him, although I’ve been struggling with the last part of that sentence for the past 96 days. Soon wasn’t soon enough.

But over the past few weeks, I have seen my dad in ways that I didn’t see before. I see my dad in my oldest girl’s mannerisms, in my boy’s physical appearance, and in my youngest girl’s expressions. I feel my dad within me in the way that I hold my hands against my face sometimes, in the way that I hug my children, and in the way that I love and care for my mother. He is ever present. He is all around me.

So I have to get better at not missing the things that I can’t have – his laugh, his advice, his concern, his voice – and I need to focus on the things about my dad that I still carry with me. There is so much to be grateful for and I need to appreciate and honour all that I have gained through my extraordinary relationship with my beloved father.

I miss you dad. I love you more than anything, and I am thankful for everything that you have given me. You’ve made me the man that I am today. And I will not disappoint you.

Me and My Dad

Time to Mourn

I’ve felt sick since I heard the news. I have so much to say but I can’t get it out. And if I wrote what I’m really thinking, it’d likely come out like the Onion’s coverage of the massacre.

My boy is in Kindergarten, and it’s hard to look at him without thinking of the 20 children that were taken today. I can’t look at Twitter without thinking of Principal Dawn Hochsprung who, by her tweets, demonstrated such love and compassion for her job, her community, and the children under her care. And, I can’t stand the politicizing - debates over the 2nd Amendment, the NRA, treatment for mental health issues – on these days that we should simply be mourning for those lost, celebrating their lives and their heroism, and giving this community the space and support needed. The politics can wait and these issues will be divisive long after we’ve laid the victims to rest.

If you want to know how you can help right now, read this Newtown resident’s perspective on the press coverage and respect this plea.

For the record, no one in Newtown was talking about gun control laws, mental health issues, or anything. We were just holding each other, trying to make sense of the senseless. We are ok with you grieving with us, but put down the camera and help us try to piece back together our lives. We need that more than media coverage of this sad day in our history.

If you need to discuss this with your children or students, please see Jason Kottke’s great list of resources on “How to Talk to Kids About School Massacres.”

And if our mainstream press really wants to make sure that this tragedy is not repeated, take some advice from this Charlie Brooker segment (especially after the 1:30 mark) on how *not* to report on mass murder.

To the victims and families devastated by this tragedy, I mourn for you. My heart is broken, and I can’t imagine your pain.